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Vocalist d.A Sebasstian is to Kill Switch...Klick what Trent Reznor is to Nine Inch Nails. Sebasstian wrote all the lyrics and music for Kill Switch...Klick's Cleopatra debut, Beat It To Fit, Paint It To Match. He also played and operated all synths, samples, drum machines, programmers wood recorders and Slambar, accompanied by Mike Ditmore on drums and "perkussion" and Paul Wynia on bass. What is a Slambar? It's a one of a kind, four stringed, fretless instrument made out of two pieces of wood, played with screwdrivers, that adds an abysmally rich texture to KsK's songs. Sebasstian built it himself. "it works kind of like a pedal steel guitar, but has a deeper sound. The Slambar has one bass and one guitar pickup so I can run different effects on each section. Not having frets enables me to slide into notes and all over the place because there is no fretboard/finger contact." Currently d.A. is hard at work on a rather large sculpture called "Sexual Device." "It's really big, "he explains. "It's made out of plastic that would just sit in landfills 'til the end of time. I'm working at a place that sells typewriter cartridges, I take the used ones, cut them into pieces, mold and melt them together. It sounds like one big blob, but together it actually looks like something. You can't really tell that it's made from plastic 7-UP bottles and whatnot."

Writing is d.A.'s first love. He has produced a chapbook of poetry, and works constantly on pieces for another. After spending most of his late teens and early twenties drunk, he sobered up and traveled around the West Coast. "I realized that my emotional growth stopped at about 19 when I was really drinking- I spent six years driving around. I started taking things seriously, especially the band. I gained a lot of inspiration from that time. All these things can turn into songs."

"Keep On Laughing Until The COPS Come" is an infectious little tune that Sebasstian wrote while his computer was in the shop. "I was in dA garage, our practice studio. Everytime we'd turn it up a bit, the neighbors would call the cops. We had many run-ins with the cops at that studio. My computer was down and I had to write a song that didn't really have a vocal track,'cause I couldn't synch everything together through the computer. i triggered some samples with the drum machine but I needed to come up with a short phrase. I had written keep on laughing until the cops come on a slip of paper, probably just after the cops had come. I sampled that phrase and retriggered it from the drum machine. That's how that song came about. Long story for such a simple song."

"ANGeR" and "GO MAN, GO" are prime examples of what make KsK's music more accessible to listeners than a lot of the industrial music being made today. This is mainly due to Sebasstian's lyrics, which he insists on including in the CD package. "I like to have my lyrics printed," he explains. "That's one of the first things I do when I buy an album- read along with the song. Sometimes it's really hard to decipher what the guy (or gal) is saying. In fact, that's how I learned to write a song, structurally wise- verse, chorus, bridge- through the lyrics."

Listen to "Follow Me," "So HAPPY" and "deCanonized," they could be called industrial, but there are also songs that could be classified as gothic ambient, including a cover of "Submission" by the Sex Pistols. "Object Of My Desire" is exquisitely tormenting in an electro-gothic way. Taken as a whole, Beat It To Fit, Paint It To Match is not your typical industrial album. According to Sebasstian, it's not supposed to be. "I hate that label 'industrial'...it's so limiting. Post-industrial grit, or just grit. G-R-I-T, 'cause it's kind of kind of gritty. But grit is too much like grunge, so we added post-industrial."

 

-by Leah Lin