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A&A REVIEWS

Kill Switch... Klick
Beat It to Fit, Paint It to Match
(Cleopatra)
reviewed in issue #70, 2/14/95

Following the (high quality) lead of acts like Nine Inch Nails and Ministry, Kill Switch... Klick starts with the killer groove. Once that is established, then anything goes. But it's that basic rhythm track that makes or breaks the industrial dance band. And these folks have what it takes.

At times the beats are a little more simplistic than I might prefer, but this small problem is overcome by the rest of the attack, usually including guitars as well as synthesizers.

The production leaves things more on the sterile side than the "live" sound that is currently in favor. But that's no reason to ignore this fine disc. There's more than enough to choose from and make you happy.


Oddities and Versions
(Cleopatra)
reviewed in issue #91, 11/6/95

Seattle's finest industrial technicians spew out a set of old demos, remixes and other stuff you haven't heard before.

Much of the fare isn't nearly as experimental as the recent album, but then, some of this stuff is three years old. It helps fill out a more complete portrait of this rather innovative outfit.

Mostly a set for fans only, those who haven't picked up on KsK could take a test drive with this. Plenty of stuff here to impress most anyone.


Degenerate
(Cleopatra)
reviewed in issue #130, 3/17/97

Smoothly aggressive, Seattle's Kill Switch... Klick has always been the embodiment of the "one-man band" sound, even though main man D.A. Sebasstian has plenty of help. Degenerate is quite the kick.

Heavily synth-laden (a nod to Vancouver, perhaps) but with more than enough real-time samples and instrumentation to keep the sound in the realm of the now. KsK has never disappointed in the past, and this album is more than I could have expected.

The production is really amazing. I know I'm focusing on that an awful lot, but you listen to this disc and tell me the sound is anything but stunning. The songs are excellent, as always, so there's no real need to pick there.

Degenerate is much more silky than the current industrial trends, but I think that might work to the band's favor. After all, trends must turn someday. Albums like this aid that process. The good stuff is what folks remember.

Gorgeous, profane and alluring, KsK has crafted another great album. With just enough electronic experimentation, even the creative jones is satisfied. Not much more to say.


Alt.
(Cleopatra)
reviewed in issue #149, 12/8/97

A hybrid sort of release, with remixes alongside 7 new tracks. The remixes don't seem to change a hell of a lot, but that's okay, since the songs were quite good to begin with.

The hallmark of D.A. Sebasstian's work as KsK has always been a willingness to use electronic recording techniques to find new types of sound and sonic experience. That desire for innovation flows through this set of songs, crashing through barriers many folks could never even envision.

All that wrapped up in a core of engaging beats and accessible melodies. How music this good could be so appealing has always somewhat surprised me, though by now I should know better. Never underestimate.

Even if it isn't a completely new group of songs, this disc is still quite impressive. KsK is simply one of the finest electronic acts around.


Organica
(Irregular)
reviewed in issue #185, 7/26/99

Um, yeah, those are D.A. Sebasstian's kids on the cover. He's doing his own thing now, and this disc does showcase a departure of sorts from his usual sound.

The creativity levels are still high, but there are many more instruments and much less electronic sounds here. The way it's done, though, is a bit more seamless than you might think. Like I said, the complexity levels are still high, and the songs are still assembled. But the feel is more... organic, to coin a term (ahem).

I've long been advocating the mix of "analog" and "digital" worlds. I know I'm using those terms inappropriately, but I think they make the point best. Well, really, this album also makes the point quite well. Sebasstian has crafted some addictive and intriguing songs, stuff that will stand up to repeated scrutiny.

That which could also be said about previous KS...K outings. And so, while in some ways a departure, Organica also continues a legacy. One that I hope continues for some time to come.